How Hotels Use Art To Stand Out (Infographic)

The world is now very accessible. Thanks to technology and the countless of accommodations all around the world ready to take every traveler in. But, because of the abundance of hotels globally, how do hotels stand out?

Today, one of the booming trends in the hospitality and tourism industry is the incorporation of art as an integral branding of a hotel or property. Here are some ways hotels use art to stand out:

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What Do Guests Think of Hotel Art?

Do hotel guests really care or notice if their hotel has good art? Hospitality tourism and hotel art has been a trend for a time now. More and more hotels from anywhere in the globe have been investing millions in acquiring good art for their guests.

There is a growing number of hotels all over the world who compete with the leading art galleries in acquiring art works, that essentially will attract more guests. Some even convert their property to an exhibit, hosting programs that hone the interest of people art—in any of its forms.

Indeed, art is one of the hotel industry’s newest marketing strategies. Hotels with interesting art displays, thought-provoking pieces and controversial works will always be talked about. Intrigue and curiosity is one method of driving people to your property’s doorstep. At the same time, magnificent, jaw dropping collections are also the talk of the town.

But, do it really make a difference to guests? Would they want to stay to a hotel more because of this amenity?

Do travelers really choose hotels for what hangs in frames on the walls?

CNN reports that yes, in a way, guests and travelers consider the art that is found in their hotels—whether they know it or not.

“I’m much more motivated by the location and the quality of the rooms,” frequent traveler Nick Winter told the news organization.

Though he admits: “When I do find myself staying somewhere with a thought-provoking painting or installation, it stops me in my tracks. I wouldn’t choose a hotel for the art, but I would certainly remember my stay if the art was amazing.”

One way to see it, customers feel and think that the attraction is getting a cultural lift on a business trip which may not allow time for a gallery or museum outing. It is very similar to getting a trip to the gallery or museum which enables them to get to know the place and the people, as well as their way of life represented by art.

Art incorporated with tourism gives a cultural lift on every travel or trip. Ideally, hotels feature the artworks of their local artists, as a way of giving them exposure, and at the same time sharing the culture of their place to their visitors.

Hospitality Art became a giant trend when people travel for business more often than for leisure. Most of them spend their days and nights in a new city just to attend endless meetings and conference, boxed in their hotel and their rooms for their whole stay. The trip was not maximized, and then they realized that if people can’t afford the time to go to museums, why not bring the artwork to the busy people?

Because of this, people doesn’t only view artistic hotels as aesthetic, but also as a cultural phenomenon that they can connect to and learn a few things from.

It is also a bonus that unlike museums and art galleries, is generally free to view; you’re not likely to have to stand in line and there are armchairs to flop in.

On the other hand, hotels view art for its potential investment value. But why not just allocate the budget into constructing rooms, offering better food or acquiring new amenities like a pool or a spa with a more immediate chance of revenue?

“Some guests come only for the art and my services,” says Domoina de Brantes, art concierge at Raffles’ Le Royal Monceau in Paris. “We have a huge collection of more than 300 pieces, revolving exhibitions of photography, plus I recommend a specific cultural event to guests every day.

“They want to be kept informed of the latest exhibitions and art events, so I get enquiries from them every day and also reach out to them with an art newsletter.”

Due to the overwhelming positive response and feedback, as well as the potential, the hotel has even appointed an art concierge. Designer Philippe Starck oversaw the hotel’s transformation from “grande dame into cutting-edge hotel”, given the hotel’s mission statement to be dedicated to art and culture.

This is probably because art has long been a symbol of high status since the early times. It is embedded in history and hardwired in our brains that art is almost synonymous to wealth, and the ability to acquire it is symbolism of one’s wealth and power. Possessing art works implies prestige, privilege and money at the same.

People always talk. Despite this day’s advancement in technology, one of the best and effective marketing strategy is the word of mouth.

They will talk out of amusement and fascination. They will talk because they disagree.

“Not everyone will like the pieces we have on show, although some will love them, but it certainly gets people talking about the hotel as well as the art,” says spokesperson Henny Frazer.

From the gallery side, Bianca Gidwani, spokesperson for the Saatchi Collection, says: “The gallery’s role is to bring art to as wide an audience as possible. Where better than a prestigious hotel with a constant stream of visitors from all over the world?

“It’s wonderful to see contemporary art installed in places which freely allow people to reflect on it as they go about their everyday lives.”

Hotels maybe temporary accommodations welcoming tourists from all over the world. For some, they may be merely places they stop and go, empty spaces that they spend time for rest. But, some hotels are making newer definitions for hotels. More and more are aiming to offer historical and cultural experiences through the art they house. Some sets it as an objective to give their guests a higher quality experience by letting them see and experience what only the rich and novelty had the privilege before: exposure to fine art.

Mirror TVs FAQs (Infographic)

What Is A Mirror TV?

Mirror TV as its name suggests can be a mirror or a TV, which is the original idea. When not in use, a mirror’s TV’s HD screen displays a high-sheen reflective finish that looks just like a standard mirror, and functions as one too. It is a two-way polarized mirror which has an embedded LCD TV mounted at the back. The polarized mirror allows viewing of the TV when it is switched on, while otherwise it serves as a flawless mirror.

Enjoy the same high definition performance and sound quality that current top-end models are offering, but when no one is using it, it can be a useful and stylish mirror for your room instead of being an eyesore.

It can enhance the overall ambiance and look of any room from the living space, kitchens and even bathrooms.

Art As The New High End Hotel Amenity

Art has long been a symbol of high status since the early times. It is embedded in history and hardwired in our brains that art is almost synonymous to wealth, and the ability to acquire it is symbolism of one’s wealth and power. Possessing art works implies prestige, privilege and money at the same

In fact, back in ancient Egypt, only pharos own art. High art performances such as theater and operas are only attended by the upper class, and masterpieces made by classical art geniuses sell for amounts unimaginable by a common man. Indeed, art has always been a symbol of wealth, luxury and power even during the day.

Today, one of the booming trends in the hospitality and tourism industry is the incorporation of art as an integral branding of a hotel or property. It is also becoming a marketing strategy that draws more guests, and in turn, revenue to businesses all over the world.

In ancient Egypt, art belonged to the personal ownership of pharos alone. Art in ancient Egypt was the personal property of the pharos. Art galleries often exhibit personal collections

obtained from high ranking members of society. Hotels have been filling their walls, halls, lobbies and rooms with acquired art from local artists to world-renowned painters and art masters, which enrich their identity and hotel brand.

Although some budget hotels across the globe begin to add localized art in their hotels, big time and luxury hotels from the key cities of the world treat art as their newest high end amenity.

Aside from top of the line fixtures and appliances, updated and newly renovated rooms, and service fit for royalty, these hotels boast of their massive art collections that are comparable to those of famous museums and galleries.

True enough, people today think with the same ideology that art equates a higher social status. As a hotel’s elegance and luxury are measured no longer by its functional amenities, but by those which are displayed and hanged on walls too.

“Being around original art is part of the lifestyle of the people who can afford these room rates,” said Alex Attia, general manager of Boston’s Charles Hotel. This luxury hotel offers rooms from $199 to $750 a night.

According to the Small Luxury Hotels of the World Association, “These are sophisticated people with discriminating tastes. They can appreciate art.”

Sarah Collinson, an innovation manager for brands said this trend is influenced by people, who grew tired of proving their wealth by buying material things.

“We’re seeing people buying less into status symbols and more into experiences. Luxury is about treating yourself, maybe a midweek beauty treatment or taking time off,” Collinson said.

Before, the most expensive artworks are placed in more public spaces guarded with the tightest security measures. Now, hotels open their doors to their guests to experience high class art within the comforts of their temporary homes.

According to Stephanie Sonnabend, Sonesta’s president and chief executive officer, “Guests appreciate the artwork in their rooms and are respectful of it, and don’t steal it, either.” In fact, flat-screen TVs are more apt to be taken, she added.

Hotels maybe temporary accommodations welcoming tourists from all over the world. For some, they may be merely places they stop and go, empty spaces that they spend time for rest. But, some hotels are making newer definitions for hotels. More and more are aiming to offer historical and cultural experiences through the art they house. Some sets it as an objective to give their guests a higher quality experience by letting them see and experience what only the rich and novelty had the privilege before: exposure to fine art.

Top Art Themes and Subjects That Sell to Hotels (Infographic)

The days when artworks are hung on hotel walls and rooms for the sake of filler or decoration is long over. Gone are the days when hotels were just a place in a foreign land offering a place for you to lodge, filled with nondescript prints as wallpapers along halls and mass-produced paintings. Today, hotels turn their lobbies, hallways and suites into gallery-like spaces, displaying famous artwork as part of their décor—hotels are not just hotels, they are transforming into art galleries, where you can spend a night or two.

Hospitality Art is fast becoming a global trend, for both luxury and budget hotels around the world. Through the importance hotel owners to different forms of art, by its own, it has become the tourist destination.

More and more members of the hospitality sector have been actively investing in art to make over their hotel and add to its value, story, identity and edge compared to the other competitors.

Although because not every hotelier has a rich art background, deciding which pieces or forms of art to invest maybe hard. Owners of hotels could have a hard time choosing and buying artworks for their businesses. Thanks to art consultants, telling their brand’s story through art is easier, as well as choosing the pieces that are relatable to their guests and complementing to their interior in general.

Basing on trends and patterns in the industry, here are the top 5 subjects and themes of artworks that sell to hotels.

Why art is more than a decoration for hotels?

Gone are the days when artworks are merely fillers of a blank wall. Today, the hospitality industry has been actively acquiring and collecting different kinds of art as a marketing strategy, a symbol of brand and a step towards innovation.

Since a new breed of travelers are dominating the tourism arena, hoteliers and owners are going with the flow when it comes to their thirst in experience and all things brand new.

Currently, hotels are not just accommodation option when travelling. One of their added feature is housing art collection, varying from works by local artists, to world-renowned painters and sculptors. Since travelers do not only sleep, eat and spend a lot of free time inside, the trend is incorporating a gallery inside—not in a decorative manner, of course.

Hoteliers are thinking even farther outside the frame, installing art in the most unexpected of ways and challenging guests to think more deeply about their experience. Art has become a fundamental, rather than ornamental, element of hotel design.

Art is more than a decoration for hotels. Today, it is an experience.

Hotels use hospitality art to introduce itself, or the place where it is located. Through the works of their local artists, hotels are becoming museum-like sanctuaries where history and culture are showcased in an artistic manner.

For guests who do not have enough time to walk around the area and learn more about a place’s personality, locally-made masterpieces serve as little cobble stones that guide them as they walk through back time.

“The art is a part of the identity of the hotel,” said Jason Pomeranc, a co-owner of the Thompson LES, “and it integrates into the architecture, design, concept and what we ethereally call the vibe, the intellectual soul of the hotel.”

Art is no longer a mere wall filler. Today, it is a brand strategy.

Hotels are not only acquiring popular art collections, they are commissioning original work, hiring curators and appointing artists in residence.  As hotels compete to differentiate themselves art, it seems, is part of a modern hotel’s identity. Jan Freitag from US hotel-industry research firm STR told the Wall Street Journal recently that the rise of art in hotels is part of the “lifestyle marketing” trend.

“Hotels are trying to be more than just grey boxes with beige carpets,” he said. “It’s all about making the stay memorable.” Whereas once it was enough to put a modernist chair in the foyer and call yourself a “design hotel” guests now want something more.

Art is not only art. Today, it’s business.

Hotel art does not only spell business for hoteliers, it is also a way to give the spotlight to artists who commission work by showcasing their works through the newest venue. Hotels opened new horizons for artists to realize the benefits of displaying art, not only as potential profit sources but also in terms of enhancing and beautifying their spaces and increasing their traffic, more and more alternative venues are becoming known for regularly showing art. The best of these venues present consistent calendars of quality shows and actually get reputations in local art communities as being pretty much the same as galleries.

When did art collection in Luxury Hotels start to become a trend?

Hospitality Art, or when hotels are becoming more like art galleries with accommodations, is one of the fast-rising trends in today’s hotelier industry. From its initial purpose of being mere decorations and space fillers, art pieces have become marketing tools to draw more attention and encourage more guests than ever.

True enough, many drastic changes have happened since the first motel in San Luis Obispo, California opened in 1925. As more and more luxury, boutique and budget hotels all around the world go by the trend and started to house and collect art works, travelers and frequent hotel goers wonder: when did this trend start?

Alex Toledano, a Paris-based art consultant whose clients include Ritz-Carlton hotels, says: “Hotels, especially hotel owners, recognize that the hotel he represents have been spending a decent amount on art for many years without it doing anything special for their property. They’ve realized that the money could be used not only to tell an interesting narrative about their properties but also to make them more memorable.”

Long before art was used as a marketing strategy, it it was utilized by hotel owners for function and added justification to their ‘luxury’ status. Brand Strategist Jean-Noël Kapferer published a paper in 1997 in which presented the semiotics of the word “luxury” as “Luxury defines beauty; it is art applied to functional items,” which emphasize that luxury products as an art form brings more psychological satisfaction, like esteem on the owner, than functional utility.

It is a bold statement piece and one that reflects a trend among top hotels worldwide to fill their spaces with original art. They are acquiring paintings and sculptures that would not disgrace a public gallery and which, even if you can’t afford to stay there, you can see free of charge or for the price of a coffee in the bar.

Macau has even commissioned a Cultural Affairs Bureau, with a Cultural Events Department dedicated to (according to its head) “luring tourists in with top-notch art”.

As time pass by and more trends shaped the industry, luxurious experiences are tantamount to every guest’s ‘hope and dreams’, as Michman and Mazze phrased it. According to their publication, it is an attempt to reach self-actualization and self-fulfillment through greater knowledge, appreciation of beauty, spiritual sophistication, peace, art, culture and aesthetics.

This notion further made art and hospitality subjective, as guests from different parts of the globe have different ethnical belonging, culture of origin, educational background and personal experience.

Hence, hotels saw this as a chance to showcase and derive the luxury experience brought in by art, to showcasing local artist talent, culture and identity. It’s only when you remember how definitively “un-local” and bland luxury hotels used to be that you realize how much has changed, Mark Jones, an editor and travel-writer from The Independent expressed.

Taiwan’s Mandarin Oriental marketing executive Michael Hobson, says the company wants to offer a “contemporary and definitively local experience at our properties”.

“Now, hotels are willing to take more of a risk. That is what is making art in hotels exciting right now. Our clients are asking for a diversity of art that we wouldn’t have expected a couple of years ago,” Toledano notes.

He adds that hotels now have the “desire to ask more of the artwork to make their property unique, rather than resembling many others.”

Some hotels want to establish a sense of place through their art, though not necessarily through local artists. The art they choose to acquire and display depict their culture and traditions through paintings of events, materials and national symbols.

Jeremy King, a hotel owner in Mayfair, London says owners who prefer investing in original art is exposed to the danger of “using the art to attract attention, rather than to enhance the experience. You find that a lot of it becomes too narcissistic, as opposed to harmonious for the clients’ experience.”

In the end, Jones notes that it is probably “the evolving taste of the super-rich, in turn driven by the Saatchi effect, where work that once seemed so alien suddenly became covetable and marketable. It could be the bohemian influence of boutique hotels. Or maybe the displaying of art is simply an easy, and relatively cheap, way to add some much needed interest and personality to your public spaces. Maybe parents will now start encouraging their kids to give up the law degree and head to art college instead. The supply of patrons has never been healthier.”

7 Artsy Hotels Around The World (Infographic)

Years ago, the basis for a great hotel rating was excellent service, friendly staff, updated amenities and delicious food offerings. Today, as the tourism industry discover and follow a new trend—more and more hotels are starting to invest in art to attract a new breed of tourists and travelers.

Hospitality Art has been a marketing strategy of hotels around the world. From extensive, world class art collections to exhibitions, art has successfully penetrated the hotelier business.

Offering art in hotels also uplift the local artists in a place, showcasing local talent as well as the culture and identity of their people. Visitors learn and experience new things through art, without even going out of their accommodation.

Here are 7 artsy hotels globe trotters should definitely check out:

7 Artsy Hotels Around The World

How Hospitality Art Can Increase Hotel Revenues

The demographics of hotel guests have been dynamic over the years. Today is the era of the experiential guests, also known as the Millenials, people who travel to experience new things, from the walls of their chosen hotels to the outside.

According to a study conducted by the Art Force Organization, Millennials are “tech-savvy, cause-driven, and attracted to unique design”, and this is where the hospitality industry can take advantage of their adventurous personalities. Their study found that “aesthetically pleasing design is clearly something that Millennials want in all environments,” and that includes hotels that house art works.

For the travelling Millenials, hotels are now more than just a comfy place for them to rest and sleep. “Hotels want to spice up their look in hopes of gaining business from this new market. This is a definitely a smart move for the industry because it’s no secret that Millennials love to travel more than the generations before them,” the Art Force’s study concluded.

But hotels and hospitality-related industry should not only focus on how their rooms look. Art Force also found that lobbies filled with art, enhanced common areas, multi-functional public spaces, and unique bar environments will draw in this new market as well.

In the recent years, hotels across the world have started to invest in art and feature artwork within their lobby design, pubic spaces and even in their guest rooms. Some hotels even take their commitment and brand strategy a few steps further. More than exhibiting art works, they also hold regular art workshops on photography and crafts, showcasing their local talents, The Tambourine reports.

Hotels in Dubai are now reaping the benefits of investing in hospitality art to increase their revenue and attract more Millenial and experiential hotel guests.

“Everybody is evolving when it comes to art,” Mona Hauser, a hotel owner in Dubai, UAE says. Her first hand interactions with the new breed of hotel guests as proof of this will suffice.  “Today, people who own big hotel chains realize that putting up a print with a few splashes of color is boring and people are more sophisticated now.”

But, not only high end-big-chain hotels are starting to invest in art to gain more revenue and attract more guests. In fact, budget-friendly properties are jumping into the art scene in order to attract guests seeking unique experiences, while staying budget-friendly.

Hauser also noted how the rise of hospitality art benefits both the hotel industry and the plight of local artists. “It is great,” she says. “If more artists can put their art out there, then the world is a better place and to see something genuine is so much better than a blank space that has simply been filled for the sake of it.

For another hotel in the country, art is not really just an experience for the eyes. Rasha Al Mutawa, director of Noon Art Boutique Hotel Apartments said that every guest differs in their own definition of art.

“For us, opening an art hotel means that someone can come and live the art rather than just look at it and leave,” he explains. He also believes that guests can connect more with local artists througb the art presented in their hotels, giving them the taste of local culture first hand from the artists themselves.

“We expect the guest to have a full understanding of the artist by the time their stay is over,” he said.

Despite Hospitality Art being a global trend, some people still argue if whether using the distinctive drive offered by arts to attract more guests and increase the revenue of a hospitality-business business is appropriate or not, effective or not.

Ecole hôtelière de Lausanne (EHL) a hospitality management University in Switzerland, answers their argument with a fact. According to their study, arts and hospitality have a positive association.

Today, most hospitality professionals recognize that arts enhance hotel guest experience. Arts being for sure emotional drivers, they will inevitably generate more visits to the hotel if chosen with sense, whether in accordance with the brand’s image or beautifully included in the facilities.

Adding arts becomes part of a hotel’s overall branding process, as a means of conveying implicit messages or values, and of differentiation from competitors. Indeed, arts and design are often blending with the brand itself.

Tips in Choosing the Right Art for your Hotel (Infographic)

The process of selecting the perfect place to stay can be overwhelming, especially for hotel guests who do not have a go to hotel for their travels. With hundreds of amazing hotel and accommodation options to choose from, how can you make your hotel stand out?

With one of the emerging trends in the hospitality industry today, incorporating art in your hotel business can open greater possibilities of attracting guests and tourists. After all, aside from a wonderful service, art can also be a unique experience you can let them remember your hotel for.

So how can hotel owners know which art to buy and include in their hotel collection? Here are some tips:
tips-in-choosing-the-right-art-for-your-hotel